(Source: Flickr / stensaasimages)

malformalady:

Taken on May 26th, 2013, this was a dissipating low precipitation thunderstorm near Broken Bow, Nebraska, that produced one of the best lightning shows I have ever witnessed in my storm chasing career. Even more beautiful was when the lightning lit up these incredible mammatus clouds in the night sky. These type of clouds are often associated with severe thunderstorms, and their ominous and foreboding appearance is a message to all that severe weather may be on its way.
Photo credit: © Anne Goforth/National Geographic Photo Contest
high resolution →

malformalady:

Taken on May 26th, 2013, this was a dissipating low precipitation thunderstorm near Broken Bow, Nebraska, that produced one of the best lightning shows I have ever witnessed in my storm chasing career. Even more beautiful was when the lightning lit up these incredible mammatus clouds in the night sky. These type of clouds are often associated with severe thunderstorms, and their ominous and foreboding appearance is a message to all that severe weather may be on its way.

Photo credit: © Anne Goforth/National Geographic Photo Contest

tramtheram:

matahitorigoto:

heavvymetalqueen:

unicorn-meat-is-too-mainstream:

The Shadow of Mount Rainier

Mount Rainier is creepy.

Concealed within his fortress, the lord of Mordor sees all. His gaze pierces cloud, shadow, earth, and flesh

you know I’ve never been lucking enough to see this phenomenon before but it is quite fantastic. I shall have to pay more attention as I walk to work now.

lustik:

Rainy Pot - Jeong Seungbin via Ixiqi and red-dot.org

Lustiktwitter | pinterest | etsy

geniusofthehole:

Tree Cathedral 
Atmospheric mist and impossibly tall and slender trees in the Sequoia National park, California.
(by Andrew Luyten)
high resolution →

geniusofthehole:

Tree Cathedral

Atmospheric mist and impossibly tall and slender trees in the Sequoia National park, California.

(by Andrew Luyten)

malformalady:

A crimson colored Sun pillar, captured near Hearst, Ontario just after sunset on June 10, 2011. Pillars take shape when sunlight is reflected from the bottom, or sometimes the top surface, of oriented, plate-shaped ice crystals. They need to be slightly tipped in the direction of the observer in order to cause the burst of vertical light. Since they’re reflection phenomena, they generally present but a single color.
Photo credit: Rick Stankiewicz

malformalady:

A crimson colored Sun pillar, captured near Hearst, Ontario just after sunset on June 10, 2011. Pillars take shape when sunlight is reflected from the bottom, or sometimes the top surface, of oriented, plate-shaped ice crystals. They need to be slightly tipped in the direction of the observer in order to cause the burst of vertical light. Since they’re reflection phenomena, they generally present but a single color.

Photo credit: Rick Stankiewicz

thatscienceguy:

Someone take me. Please. Anyone. I want to go now!

temperpaints:

scienceoftheidiot:

I could look at these gifs for hours…

^_^

(Source: angelintherain)

(Source: luvgaymodels)

phenex1331:

20 places that don’t look real (part 2)

11.Mount Roraima-Venezuela

12.Naico mine-Mexico

13.Red beach-China

14.Solar du Uyuni-Bolivia

15.Tainzi mountians-China

16.Tulip fields-Netherlands

17.Tunnel of love-Ukraine

18.Wisteria flower tunnel-Japan

19.Zhangye Danxia landform-China

20.Zhangya Danxia Landfrom 2-China